Tuesday, 27 April 2010

Hung Parliament: a Turning Point for UK Politics?

I really hope we get a hung Parliament this year, for a number of reasons.

First, it will show to the politicians that all of them sharing the populist centre-ground is bad. After all, what choice (And by that I mean real choice) do we the electorate have if all the main parties cram themselves into a narrow niche of the political spectrum?
Most politicians are spouting on at the moment that a hung Parliament will be bad mainly because it means they won't be able to call the shots. In reality they're saying its bad for them.

What it isn't, is bad for democracy, because after this hung parliament, after the fighting, bickering wheeling and dealing has been done, the major parties might just figure out that chasing populist policies isn't the way to run a country and might for once, start distancing themselves from each other and give us a proper range of choices once more.

Well, I can only hope.

It might also signal to the population at large that there isn't really anything seperating the main parties and they might, for once, start looking at independant candidates.

I can only hope about that as well.

Because as I've said for a number of years now, this year and this election is a crucial one in the history of this country. You may not think it, but this is a pivotal point: our country can rise in light, or fall into darkness.
Right now, we seem destined for darkness.

3 comments:

  1. Everything also depends on how you choose, obviously the topic of economic crisis and the future management policies should be carefully taken into account when voting, but if the chosen garnish with good management.

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  2. How do you choose between three entities that have almost identical policies.
    There are differences, but you're talking semantics, infinitessimal differences that make little or no difference to the country.

    Not one of the main parties is offering radical change, the sort of change we need to sort the country out.

    Instead the change they propose is a new management, a new set of faces rearranging the deckchairs.

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  3. I to hoped for a hung parliament, as the politicians ,as usual , seem concerned while campaigning(re Duffygate) then revert to the superior egotistcal i know whats best demeanor, the only caveat is how will financial markets, view a hung parliament? although countries like germany seem to do ok. im traditionally a labour voter that works in care for local government, i really just want to keep my job

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